The First World WARM Festival

First World Warm Festival

The First World WARM Festival

Sarajevo - June 28th / July 3rd, 2014


 

Saturday June 28th / 15:00
WARM Festival Pre-Opening
Cartooning for Peace
“Every State of War” exhibition
with Plantu (Cartooning for Peace)
Obala Maka Dizdara (between City Hall and Fine Arts Academy)


Sunday June 29th / 19:00
WARM Festival Opening
by Rémy OurdanDanis TanovicMirsad Purivatra, and Plantu (Cartooning for Peace)
Cartooning for Peace
“Every State of War” exhibition
Obala Maka Dizdara (between City Hall and Fine Arts Academy)

Sunday June 29th / 20:00
WARM Festival opening party
Meeting Point

Monday June 30th / 10:00-17:30
“The Culture of War”
WARM Conferences
Hotel Europe

Monday June 30th / 19:00
“Grozny Nine Cities” by Olga Kravets, Maria Morina and Oksana Yushko
& “Chris Hondros Testament”
exhibitions
Opening by Olga Kravets and Anna Shpakova (Grozny Nine Cities), and Christina Piaia (Chris Hondros Fund)
with Aurélie Viel (Bayeux-Calvados Award for War Correspondents) and Jean-François Leroy (Visa pour l'Image)
National Gallery

Monday June 30th / 21:00
“Tomorrow Tripoli – The Revolution of the Rats”, by Florent Marcie
A WARM partner project / world premiere
Discussion with Florent Marcie
Meeting Point

Tuesday July 1st / 10:00-13:00
“The Future of WARM”
WARM Workshop
Hotel Europe

Tuesday July 1st / 21:00
“Special Syria program / Part I”
“The Way to the Frontline”, by Laurent van der Stockt
“Snapshots of History in the Making”, by Abounaddara
A WARM partner project
Discussion with Charif Kiwan (Abounaddara)
Meeting Point

Wednesday July 2nd / 21:00
“Special Syria program / Part II”
“Silvered Water, Syria Self-Portrait”, by Ossama Mohammed and Wiam Simav Bedirxan
“Children on the Frontline”, by Marcel Mettelsiefen
Meeting Point

Thursday July 3rd / 12:00
“Tomorrow Tripoli – The Revolution of the Rats”, by Florent Marcie
A WARM partner project / special screening for a Libyan delegation from Zintan
Discussion with Florent Marcie
Meeting Point

Thursday July 3rd / 21:00
“Sarajevo, Children of war”, by Virginie Linhart
Meeting Point

Thursday July 3rd / 22:00
WARM Festival closing party
Meeting Point

From June 30th to July 3rd
“#DYSTURB”
with Fabio Bucciarelli, Alvaro Canovas, Bryan Denton, Rafael Fabres, Laurence Geai, Olga Kravets, Camille Lepage, Alice Martins, Giorgos Moutafis, Mosa'ab ElShamy, Pierre TerdjmanLaurent Van der Stockt, Rafael Yaghobzadeh
A photography / A street art WARM partner project
Sarajevo streets


The WARM Festival events are free public events.
Please arrive early at Conferences and Film Screenings to secure a seat.



The First World WARM Festival full program

Sunday June 29th / 19:00
WARM Festival Opening
Cartooning for Peace
“Every State of War” exhibition
Obala Kulina bana (between City Hall and Fine Arts Academy)

Cartooning for Peace is a network of 130 press cartoonists who decided to put their sense of humor and talent at the service of tolerance and respect of other people's opinion – which does not exclude impertinence nor freedom of speech and tone.
1994-2014: A Century of Wars
This year, the world is celebrating the 100th anniversary of WW1. It is generally considered that the 20th century has started with the outburst of this conflict. A decade of barbarism: two world wars, four genocides, the use of the atomic weapon against civilians, decolonization wars, and many civil wars. Weapons of mass destruction (biological, chemical, nuclear or radiological) are the 20th century's inheritance. Today, war is modernizing. Drones and robots are the symbols for 21st century weapons. They are not alone. In this domain, science is expanding human imagination...
Cyber-war
Yesterday's sciences fiction is today's reality. Weapons have become intelligent. Computers and networks are at the heart of the military arsenal. But the doctrine is evolving. Transforming soldiers in supermen, dreaming to make them invincible, that was fine. Is it not more ambitious to make them leave the battlefield? To imagine them differently? Planes without pilots, computer assisted bombs and rockets have become a reality. To invade and control the cyberspace, that is tomorrow's goal.
The founder of Cartooning for Peace, Plantu, is a French cartoonist specializing in political satire. His work has regularly appeared in the newspaper Le Monde since 1972. Having started medical school, Jean Plantu moved to Brussels to attend drawing lessons at Ecole Saint-Luc founded by Hergé. In 1972 he joined Le Monde with a first cartoon on the Vietnam War. From 1980 to 1986 he collaborated with the newspaper Phosphore and since 1991 he has been publishing a weekly page in L’Express. The same year he won the « Rare document award » at the Angers Festival du Scoop for managing to get signatures by Yasser Arafat and Shimon Peres on the same drawing. In 2006 Plantu turned the wish he shared with Kofi Annan into reality – a large number of cartoonists were brought together and Cartooning for Peace finally saw the light of day.
Sponsor: Ville de Genève / City of Geneva


Monday June 30th / 10:00-17:30
“The Culture of War”
WARM Conferences
Hotel Europe

10:00-10:15 Welcome: Rémy OurdanPaul Lowe
10.15-11.00 Keynote: Hilary Roberts of the Imperial War Museum: World War I Photography
11:15-12:15 Session 1: Photography and Conflict, moderated by Brigittte Lardinois (PARC/UAL)
István Virágvölgyi (Robert Capa Center), Hilary Roberts (IWM World War I)Paul Lowe ( PARC/UAL)Olga Kravets (Grozny Nine Cities)
12:15-13:15 Lunch
13:15-14:15 Session 2: Literature, Theatre, Journalism and War, moderated by Paul Lowe (PARC/UAL)
Nihad Kresevljakovic (SARTR and War), Faruk Sehic (Tales of War)
14:15-15:00 Session 3Interventions in Society, moderated by Paul Lowe
Velma Saric (Rescuers Project), Sabina Cehajic-Clancy (Youth Reconciliation)
15:15-16:15 Session 4: Memories and Museums, moderated by Hilary Roberts (Imperial War Museum)
Stéphane Grimaldi (Caen-Normandy Memorial), Roger Mayou (Red Cross Museum), Patrick Nicole (Caen-Normandy Memorial), Denis Peschanski (CNRS – French national centre for scientific research)
16:30-17:30 Plenary Discussion Art, War and Culture, moderated by Paul Lowe (PARC/UAL)
Partners: Caen-Normandy Memorial - Photography and the Archives Research Centre (University of the Arts London)


Monday June 30th / 19:00
“Grozny Nine Cities” exhibition, by Olga Kravets, Maria Morina and Oksana Yushko
National Gallery

A joint project by Olga Kravets, Maria Morina and Oksana Yushko, exploring specific aspects of Grozny’s aftermath through considering them as “cities” hidden within Grozny.
Curator: Anna Shpakova
Take a walk down Putin Prospect, Grozny’s main street, with shining marble facades, look carefully at long limbed Muslim women filing out of beauty salons, men riding brand new SUV, and you would never believe that this place was leveled by Russian aerial and artillery assaults less than a decade ago. Pause. Wait to celebrate peace, the reinvented life: inside, behind the freshly painted, pale pink walls, hate and despair still perform their sad dance. The ruined hopes and dreams - Chechnya's wounds stay open like the deep puddles reflecting high sky outside the enormous central mosque. No fancy, newly opened sushi bars, no propaganda posters portraying Chechen President Ramzan Kadyrov, on every other building, can hide Grozny’s loneliness.
Layer by layer, the “Grozny: Nine Cities” documentary project peels the veil off for you to uncover what is really going on in the complex life of the Chechen capital. Inspired by Thornton Wilder’s novel “Theophilus North,” the authors display various hidden and yet core aspects of human lives in post- war Grozny, the city built on top of the mass graves after two bloody wars.  The project’s nine themes (or nine cities) devoted to the nation that for centuries tried to break free from Moscow’s control, penetrate the unstoppable efforts that Chechens undertake in search of their own way to happiness.
The City of Memory visual chapter reflects the unfading history of nearly 300,000 human lives destroyed by the two recent wars. Moscow vowed to win over Chechen civilians by rebuilding their devastated society, but seemed mainly interested in its loyalty to the Kremlin and the City of Production, Chechnya's oil.
The City of War shows Grozny, which translates as fearsome, has never stopped breathing wars, the violence finding new targets. With Russian tanks gone off its streets, Russian nationals are isolated into the City of Strangers. Chechen suicide bombers attacking Chechen public places, Chechen police detaining Chechen civilians for being involved with radical Islamic underground tear apart the City of War.
Dealing with violence, as with rain and snow, the city tries on its Sufi identity – new mosques, new Sharia laws emerge in ever block of the City of Religion, its streets being renamed after Suffi Sheiks. Uncovered women’s heads, even on street advertisements, must be shameful for Chechen men, as local television appeals to the City of Men. Men proud of their black BMWs, assault rifles and pointy, black shoes ban the appearance of unveiled women in public places. The City of Women, as a symphony devoted to beauty features the most attractive face of Grozny.
With more authority wired from Moscow, Chechen President Ramzan Kadyrov, a former rebel fighter famous for silencing whistle blowers, creates the City of Servants with overwhelming armies of his fans, stadiums full of people chanting his name and Ramzan News TV chronicles covering his daily routine. The idolizing of one leader has never been a traditional concept for Chechen society. Historically, many Chechen clans constructed stone towers on their own land, a symbol of stable defense and self-confidence. In today’s City of Normality people exhausted by over 15 year of vile fighting and self-destruction cover floors in their new brick homes with thick, bright colored carpets, throw feasts and dance their feet off at crowded weddings in their most beautiful clothes, grabbing the chance to enjoy the happy moments before more troubles roll into their fearsome city.
Text by Anna Nemtsova
Partner: Bayeux-Calvados Award for War Correspondents


Monday June 30th / 19:00
“Chris Hondros Testament” exhibition
National Gallery

Testament is a collection of photographs and writing by late photojournalist Chris Hondros spanning over a decade of coverage from most of the world’s conflicts since the late 1990s, including Kosovo, Afghanistan, the West Bank, Iraq, Liberia, Egypt, and Libya.
Through Hondros’ images, we witness a jubilant Liberian rebel fighter exalt during a firefight, a U.S. Marine remove Saddam Hussein’s portrait from an Iraqi classroom, American troops ride confidently in a thin-skinned unarmoured Humvee during the first months of the Iraq war, “the probing eyes of an Afghan village boy,” and “rambunctious Iraqi schoolgirls enjoying their precious few years of relative freedom before aging into more restricted adulthoods.”
Hondros was not just a front-line war photographer, but also a committed observer and witness, and his work humanizes complex world events and brings to light shared human experiences. Evident in his writings, interspersed throughout, Hondros was determined to broaden our understanding of war and its consequences.
This unyielding determination led Hondros to take dozens of trips to Iraq and Afghanistan, even as the news turned elsewhere. During these “routine” trips, Hondros examined and observed daily life in these war-torn societies. His inventive Humvee picture series frames the ever-changing landscapes of these countries, offering a glimpse into the daily lives of those most affected by conflict.
“One of the on-going themes in my work, I hope, and one of the things I believe in, is a sense of human nature, a sense of shared humanity above the cultural layers we place on ourselves [which don't] mean that much compared to the human experience.”
Partner: Visa pour l’Image Perpignan - Sponsor: E-Center


Monday June 30th / 21:00
“Tomorrow Tripoli – The Revolution of the Rats”, a film by Florent Marcie
A WARM partner project / world premiere
Meeting Point

From the start of the Libyan revolution, a small group of insurgents, far from Benghazi, defied the regime from their villages in the Nefoussa mountains. Isolated from the insurgent stronghold in eastern Libya and from the outside world, surrounded by Gaddafi army, they fought and reached, against all odds, one sacrifice after another, Tripoli. Tomorrow Tripoli will tell the story of these humble and generous fighters who embraced the revolution. For eight months, the director Florent Marcie shared their destiny, filmed them and followed their crazy offensive until the fall of the dictator. Tomorrow Tripoli is a film about the men who lived and won the revolution.
Florent Marcie began photography in 1989 during the Romanian Revolution, and then moved to documentary filmmaking. He shoots, edit and produce himself his films, all related to war. He is the director of Saïa, a short film on a frontline at night in Afghanistan, and of Itchkéri Kenti, a long documentary film on the war in Chechenya, among others. He is now working on Commander Khawani, a film which portraits an afghan commander through 15 years of conflict. He lives between Paris and Tripoli.


Tuesday July 1st / 10:00-13:00
“The Future of WARM”
WARM Workshop
Hotel Europe

WARM members, partners and friends meet to help plan the future of the WARM Foundation and the WARM Archives Center.
The WARM Center’s Residence will welcome the professionals as well as emerging talents in the fields of reporters, artists and researchers from all around the world and provide a stimulating environment for them to work and exchange.
The WARM Center will develop an Archives and Research Center of material relevant to the study of international conflicts.
The WARM Archives Center will be a unique place where historians can research contemporary conflicts, and a central point to develop a network of local archives centers from countries at war where WARM Members are working.
Discussion with WARM members, partners and friends Pierre Courtin (Duplex)Maral Deghati (WARM)Charles-Henry Frizon (CAPA)Ziyah Gafic (Photographer / WARM), Stéphane Grimaldi (Caen-Normandy Memorial)Jean Hatzfeld (Writer)Charif Kiwan (Abounaddara)Boro Kontic (Mediacentar Sarajevo)Brigittte Lardinois (PARC/UAL)Jean-François Leroy (Visa pour l’Image Perpignan)Paul Lowe (PARC/UAL / WARM)Roger Mayou (Red Cross Museum), Patrick Nicole (Caen-Normandy Memorial), Rosa Olmos (BDIC Nanterre)Rémy Ourdan (Le Monde / WARM)Denis Peschanski (CNRS), Hilary Roberts (Imperial War Museum)Velma Saric (Post-Conflict Research Center / WARM)Vaughan Smith (Frontline Club London)Aurélie Viel (Bayeux-Calvados Award for War Correspondents)Val Williams (PARC/UAL), Christopher Yggdre (L’Agence à Paris / WARM)


Tuesday July 1st / 21:00
“Special Syria program / Part I”
“The Way to the Frontline”, by Laurent van der Stockt
“Snapshots of History in the Making”, a film by Abounaddara
A WARM partner project
Meeting Point

“The Way to the Frontline”, a photo slideshow by Laurent van der Stockt
District of Jobar, Damascus, Syria, May 2013
In the Damascus controlled by armed revolutionaries, holes stand instead of rooms, kitchens, courtyards and living rooms of all those who have died, disappeared from their homes, fled the war, now serve as a path to the war. Some signs guide them to the front line, others away from it. In both directions, walls conceal their movements from the eyes of the enemy. They are both the ghosts of all the absences they cross as well as guardians of these places. If nothing interrupts them, it takes ten minutes to complete their trajectory. Almost the same time it takes to watch this projection. During this time, short and infinite, they will have come across the remains of the joys, intimacy, childhood, meals, love and misfortunes of hundreds of lives. The only visible and remaining traces of these broken lives.

“Snapshots of History in the Making”, a film by Abounaddara
What can cinema do in face of the influx of images and information depicting Syria as a “country of evil “? This is the raison d‘être of the film—an invitation on a journey inside the counter shots of the Syrian news. It opens on Damascus, rocked by cries of freedom and the crackle of fire, and closes on a burial scene that turns into a resurrection. In between, the protagonists march in silence, or speak of their own dramas. From these snapshots unfold fragments of a history in the making, in which the protagonists are neither heroes nor victims, but men and women who happen to be in Syria, but could be elsewhere.
Abounaddara is a group of Syrian filmmakers involved in the revolt against barbarism. Founded in 2010, Abounaddara is releasing its films anonymously on the web in order to avoid censorship. Since the beginning of the revolution in 2011, Abounaddara has released one short film every Friday as a testimony of the fight for freedom in Syria. Fifteen of these films have been selected in international festivals (Venice, Lisbon, Belfort, etc).


Wednesday July 2nd / 21:00
“Special Syria program / Part II”
“Silvered Water, Syria Self-Portrait”, a film by Ossama Mohammed and Wiam Simav Bedirxan
“Children on the Frontline”, a film by Marcel Mettelsiefen
Meeting Point

“Silvered Water, Syria Self-Portrait”, a film by Ossama Mohammed and Wiam Simav Bedirxan
Shot by a reported “1,001 Syrians,” according to the filmmakers, Silvered Water, Syria Self-Portrait impressionistically documents the destruction and atrocities of the civil war through a combination of eye-witness accounts shot on mobile phones and posted to the internet, and footage shot by Bedirxan during the siege of Homs. Bedirxan, an elementary school teacher in Homs, had contacted Mohammed online to ask him what he would film, if he was there. Mohammed, working in forced exile in Paris, is tormented by feelings of cowardice as he witnesses the horrors from afar, and the self-reflexive film also chronicles how he is haunted in this dreams by a Syrian boy once shot to death for snatching his camera on the street.

“Children on the Frontline”, a film by Marcel Mettelsiefen
The children of Syria are often the forgotten victims in the ongoing civil war. More than eleven thousand children have been killed and over a million are now refugees. Syria’s largest city Aleppo, has become engulfed by fighting between pro and anti-regime groups and over two thousand children have been killed there. Schools have shut, food is in serious shortage and there is the constant threat of shelling, sniper fire and kidnap. Against this stark backdrop, Marcel Mettelsiefen spent nine months filming the moving story of five young children whose lives have been changed forever by the war in Syria. They are three young sisters Helen, Farah and Sara and their brother Mohammed; whose father is a rebel commander in Aleppo and Aboude a singer and poster boy for the Syrian uprising. All five have shown amazing resilience, forsaking their innocence and adapting to life, as the world around them slips into greater chaos and anarchy.
This is a Channel 4 Dispatches debut from Marcel Mettelsiefen, an acclaimed photojournalist who cut his teeth reporting in the Middle East and more recently in Syria, where he made the heartbreaking short film ‘Agony in Aleppo’ for Channel 4 News which won the 2013 FPA Award for TV News 2013. The film is produced and directed by the double BAFTA Award winning Anthony Wonke.


Thursday July 3rd / 21:00
“Sarajevo, Children of war”, a film by Virginie Linhart
Meeting Point

Vanja, Adnan and Nadja were 9, 8 or 2 year old when the war broke out in Sarajevo in 1992. Those children were harshly wounded and had been taken to France to be nursed with their mother. Romain Goupil filmed their evacuation and decided to become the “video postman” between those in France and their families trapped in Sarajevo. 20 years later, those children watch the messages that Romain Goupil filmed and remember their stories.
Partner: Sarajevo coeur de l'Europe


From June 30th to July 3rd
“#DYSTURB”
with Fabio Bucciarelli, Alvaro Canovas, Bryan Denton, Rafael Fabres, Laurence Geai, Olga Kravets, Camille Lepage, Alice Martins, Giorgos Moutafis, Mosa'ab ElShamy, Pierre TerdjmanLaurent Van der Stockt, Rafael Yaghobzadeh
A photography / street art WARM partner project
Sarajevo streets

Initiated by Pierre Terdjman, we are a group of photojournalists using urban spaces to highlight strong stories often unpublished by the international media. By sticking photographs on city walls, we want to open eyes, trigger reactions, and show the reality of the world. Our approach is social, informative and educational. We believe photojournalism is not dead so we release it on a new format.


WARM Festival partner hotels
Hotel Europe www.hoteleurope.ba/inde
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Hotel Astra www.hotel-astra.co.ba/index.php?lang=en
Hotel Astra Garni www.astra-garni.co.ba/index.php?lang=en
Hotel Art www.hotelart.ba/index.php?jezik=eng